Good Thursday morning, dear readers! As we observe the holiday of Shavuot and Memorial Day, we take a moment to reflect on the significance of this special Jewish holiday.

Shavuot, also known as the Festival of Weeks, is a two-day celebration that begins at sunset on the evening of the sixth day of the Hebrew month of Sivan and concludes at nightfall on the eighth day. This year, it begins on the evening of May 16 and ends on the evening of May 18.

Historically, Shavuot marks the time when the Jewish people received the Torah at Mount Sinai, which is considered a pivotal moment in Jewish history. This holiday is often referred to as the "birthday" of the Torah and is celebrated with prayer, Torah study, and the reading of the Ten Commandments.

In modern times, Shavuot has taken on additional meanings and traditions. Many Jews celebrate the holiday by eating dairy foods, such as cheesecake and blintzes, in honor of the sweetness of the Torah. Some communities also hold all-night Torah study sessions, known as Tikkun Leil Shavuot.

Shavuot is a joyous holiday that celebrates the Jewish people's connection to