The United States has been dealing with the issue of the debt ceiling for several years now. Essentially, the debt ceiling is the maximum amount of money the government can borrow to pay for its obligations, such as Social Security and Medicare. When the government reaches the debt ceiling, it can no longer borrow, and it must either cut spending or default on its debt.

The debt ceiling has been a contentious issue for both Republicans and Democrats. Republicans have often used it as leverage to demand spending cuts, while Democrats have argued that it is an artificial limit that threatens the country's creditworthiness.

Recently, President Biden's advisers have been working hard to raise the debt ceiling. They believe that if Biden can get it done, he will be rewarded by voters. The president's agenda includes a number of expensive programs, such as universal pre-K, paid family leave, and free community college. To pay for these programs, the government will need to borrow money, so Biden's advisers see raising the debt ceiling as essential to the success of his agenda.

The debt ceiling is not a new issue for President Biden. During his time as Vice President, he was involved in negotiations to raise the ceiling in 2011 and 2013. In both cases, there